Why Disney’s “Frozen” Is a Bad Movie

I just finished watching the popular Disney movie, “Frozen”, for the second time. The hype surrounding the movie was obnoxious and everyone was saying that, “‘Frozen’ is one of the best movies of all time.” Watching it my first time around, it wasn’t great; the bar was set pretty high and my expectations didn’t meet up to the reality of the movie. But after my second time watching it, it has solidified in my brain that this movie is one of the worst Disney has ever produced.

There’s actually a funny history surrounding this movie. Walt Disney wanted to make this movie all the way back in 1943. “Frozen” was supposed to be Disney’s adaptation of the popular fairy tale, “The Snow Queen”, written by Hans Christian Anderson (Get it? Hans, Kristoff, Anna, Sven. Good job, Disney). “The Snow Queen” actually has, what would be Elsa, as the villain. They decided they couldn’t create the movie in the 40s because they couldn’t find a way to adapt it to a modern audience. They tried again in the late 1990s, but the project was scrapped when one of the head animators on the project, Glen Keane, quit. In 2010, they scrapped it again because they still couldn’t find a way to make the story work. Then, in 2011, they finally decided on making Anna the younger sister of the Snow Queen, which was enough for them to create “Frozen”.

“Frozen” was directed by Chris Buck (known for “Tarzan”) and Jennifer Lee (known for “Wreck-it-Ralph”). The bar was set pretty high for me seeing as both those movies were well above the standards of a “kid’s movie”. The story was going to be just like the fairy tale, but then, Christophe Beck composed the hit song, “Let it Go”. The production team went crazy; instead of trying to fit the song into the movie, they rewrote the entire plot and Elsa’s entire character to fit the song. I have never heard of an entire movie being changed to fit one song. Because of this, it’s blatantly obvious that no one could decide on anything in this movie. Since Elsa isn’t the antagonist, there really was no real evil force. The Duke of Weaselton is brought up to be the villain in the beginning when he states, “Open those gates so I may unlock your secrets and exploit your riches. Did I say that out loud?” Why do you want to unlock the secrets and exploit their riches?

The Duke has absolutely no development to the point where he doesn’t even have a name. He barely even gets screen time. So if he isn’t the villain, who is? Well, in the last 15 minutes of the movie, Anna’s fiance, Prince Hans, is brought up to be the villain, stating he wants to rule a kingdom and he can’t because of his 12 other brothers. This comes out of absolutely nowhere. There were no hints, no evil glances, no sidebars or monologues, nothing. He even gives out blankets and hot soup to every person in the kingdom of Airendale. Prince Hans even says, he will protect Airendale because Anna left him in charge and “will not hesitate to protect Airendale from treason” when the Duke states he wants to take over. I can’t stand it when they get so lazy as to just throw in a villain at the last few minutes because they couldn’t actually bring up a real villain. Prince Hans states that he wanted to take over and he was going to kill Elsa and all this other crap, but Elsa was just about to be killed and he saved her life. Why would he save her life if he wanted her dead? None of it made sense and it irked me the entire movie.

Frozen recycles animation and character models from their previous hit, “Tangled”. The main characters, Elsa and Anna, use the same exact model as Rapunzel from “Tangled”. This controversy has been huge around the internet, calling Disney “lazy” and the such. Personally, I was okay with this. Disney is known for recycling animations (which can be seen here). Even though it was really strange that Elsa and Anna had the same exact face and body structure and the only difference between them were the freckles and their hair, it didn’t bother me too much. But, during the coronation scene, Elsa says to Anna, “You look beautiful.” Pretty ironic if you ask me.

The movie starts off with Elsa and Anna playing together with Elsa’s ice magic. It’s cute at first, but then Elsa strikes Anna in her head and they have to “thaw out the ice” or something along those lines. So they ask the trolls to heal her and they wipe Anna’s memories of Elsa having magic. Then, they lock the castle doors so no one can ever see Elsa and lock Elsa away in her room to never speak to her sister again. This is where it all starts to go downhill. None of it made sense. Why would you wipe Anna’s memories of Elsa having magic? If it was easily fixed, why not just explain to her that they can’t play with Elsa’s magic anymore because it’s out of hand? She would’ve known the consequences afterwards. It’s like if you touch a hot stove; you’re curious, you touch it, you burn yourself, you never touch it again. The fear solidifies subconsciously. Even if you could explain why she needed her memories erased, why was Anna locked inside the castle doors too? Anna had no recollection of the events, even at the end of the movie, so why was Anna being punished for something Elsa did? They could have easily allowed her to talk to the townsfolk and have a good time outside the castle while Elsa was locked away.

There’s this motif throughout the movie about locked doors; they lock the castle doors, Anna knocks on Elsa’s door and she never answers, Anna and Prince Hans sing the song, “Love is an Open Door”, Anna says to Elsa, “All you know is how to shut people out.” I found the motif pretty clever until they forced it down my throat. When Anna reaches the ice castle, she knocks on the door. When the door opens, she says, “Well that’s a first.” It’s a giant punch in the chest when you think you’ve analyzed a motif and you can go on and on about how amazing the directors were for putting it in there, but then the directors hold your hand and forcefully say, “Hey! This a motif! You should totally love us for this!” I would’ve been okay with it too if they just didn’t put that one line in the movie. When you read a book and you analyze it, the author is trying to let you come to the conclusion yourself and let you discuss it. It’s the same with movies. There was no need to forcefully tell us that this was a motif. Doing so was actually counterproductive. It popped my bubble.

This lead me to the question, “Why was Anna the main character?” Here’s a checklist of every plot-moving event in the movie:

Elsa strikes Anna so they have to lock the castle gates and Elsa can never talk to anyone ever again
Elsa is becoming queen
The entire kingdom gets frozen over because of Elsa
Elsa arguably has the best song in the entire movie
Anna has to find Elsa so that Elsa can save the entire kingdom
Hans has to kill Elsa to become king

Everything centers around Elsa. So why have Anna be the main character? Anna didn’t have any real character development in the movie while Elsa was completely fleshed out in every scene that she’s in. Just watch the scene from her song, “Let It Go”The entire song is about her “letting go” of her fear and coming to terms with her powers and being herself. This would’ve made a for a better plot; a woman finally coming to terms with herself, society trying to shut her down, and her fight to be accepted as who she is. Instead, it’s about Anna trying to find her sister so her sister can save the kingdom. It’s like Phil being the main character of Hercules or Mushu being the main character for Mulan. It doesn’t make any sense. Anna isn’t as interesting as Elsa. Sure, she’s funny and relate-able, but that could easily have been Elsa. Everyone can relate to not fitting into the social norms. So I reiterate, why have Anna be the main character?

Speaking of Anna, they said the only way to save her was “one true act of love”. There were many “true acts of love.” Kristoff bringing her to the trolls, Olaf giving her that pep talk, Kristoff bringing her to Hans to save her. All of these were “true acts of love”, but none of them counted because it didn’t “fit the dynamic of sisterhood.” The whole dynamic between Elsa and Anna felt so forced to the point where I stopped caring halfway through the movie. Mostly because Anna doesn’t actually evolve as a character until the very end of the movie. Even then, the development isn’t that major.Olaf is another thing that felt so force-fed. It was cute that the snowman Elsa and Anna created when they were young became a real living being and helped Anna out on her quest, but he didn’t do much. At all. He sings a song about the summer, makes a ton of jokes, gives Anna a pep talk at the end of the movie, more jokes, then that’s it. He doesn’t really face much adversity, making him extremely 1 dimensional. It’s obvious they put him in there just to be cute and to target a wider audience. There’s a test that I use to explain 1 dimensional characters; if you can replace the character with a lamp, and the plot could still advance, then the character didn’t need to be there. I promise you, if you watch the movie again and follow that test, you’ll understand exactly what I saying. What’s worse is that he could’ve actually been a catalyst to Anna regaining her memories of her sister and finally realizing why she feels the way she does. But instead, he’s nothing but a comedic relief that has no part in the plot whatsoever.

The whole movie and plot felt so rushed and like no one could agree on anything. From the villains to the plot to the characters; it’s all rushed. It felt like they said, “Hey, “Tangled” was great! Let’s just take the stuff we used from “Tangled” and get this movie off our checklist after 70 years.” But, there is one thing that did surprise me; the soundtrack. The music was phenomenal. Every song felt very broadway-esque and fit the scenes perfectly. “Let It Go”, “Love is an Open Door”, and all the rest of the songs made my heart soar and gave me hope for the next Disney titles to have music on par with the classics like “Mulan” or “The Lion King”.

And that’s my opinion on Disney’s “Frozen”. Honestly, this movie was just plain bad. I say, wait for it to go on Broadway and see it there. I firmly believe that the Broadway musical will be light-years better than this atrocity. They’ll have more time for production, more time to explain and develop their characters and plots, and the effects will be really sick. I can’t wait to see how they bring up Elsa’s Ice Castle! If you don’t agree with any of my points, do feel free to leave a comment with your opinion! Unless you’re gonna argue that this movie wasn’t targeted to my demographic and that it was “made for kids”. I will then point you in the directions of the masterpieces known as “Tangled”, “The Lion King”, “Mulan”, “Brave”, and almost every other Disney movie before this. I would love to see what everyone else thought of the movie!

James Dean Movie, ‘Joshua Tree’ Gives A Different Look At The Late Actors Life

For many years now, James Dean, even in his death, has captivated and stirred curiosity of many people. The great films he has been part of has stricken the world with his charm, forever immortalizing him in movies. The late actor who perished due to an unfortunate event still stands as one of the best actors of all time. Though there have been a good number of biopics of the actor, an upcoming Dean movie gives a different perspective and approach to the life of the famous actor. You can learn about some of his past life events, and what drove him to become the famous actor who left an impression on thousands of lives.

In some past works James Dean’s sexuality was the subject of rumors. Whether he was gay or bisexual has been the main question of the past few years. However, the news about the late actor’s gay acts has faced scrutiny. Perhaps he engaged in homosexual acts only to give his career a boost, but then again, this has faced a good amount of debate. Even though people have been saying that the actor himself was gay, it is commonly known that he was at most a bisexual, as he was a popular ladies man.

James Dean was undoubtedly a talented young actor who’s life has been taken away at such an early age. Who knows what we could have seen his career bloom into, but it certainly would only improve his legendary status. Though this actor only had 3 films, ‘Giant’ with co stars Elizabeth Taylor, ‘East of Eden’ and ‘Rebel Without a Cause’ in the year 1955.

The upcoming Dean movie shows a different side of James Dean to feed the audiences curiosity of his sexuality. The film was directed and written by Matthew Mishory entitled, ‘Joshua Tree, 1951: A Portrait of James Dean’. Unlike the many other Dean movies, ‘Joshua Tree’ gives a different and very unique approach to the life of the charming actor. This film gave a fairly different and very striking take that has grabbed the attention of many people.

Actor James Preston from ABC’s ‘The Gates’ stars in the role of the brilliant James Dean. He is joined by the ‘L Word’ actress, Erin Daniels and ‘Queer as Folk’ Robert Gant. This Dean movie talks about the life of the late actor before he gained his popularity in Hollywood.

Date Movies – Observing Relationship Behaviors – On and Off the Big Screen

So, you’ve found a new potential partner. You’re observing each other and comparing items from your lists of requirements, needs and wants. You ask lots of questions – he/she asks lots of questions. You talk and talk about your experiences, viewpoints and notions. However some people can really “talk the talk” – but walk a completely different walk. What someone says about his/her values and beliefs may not be as accurate as how he or she reacts or responds to experiences in real life. So, how can you arrange an experience so that you can observe the reactions?

The movie industry has provided thousands of opportunities to peer into the dynamics of people’s lives and relationships from a slight distance. And they’ve gotten really good at presenting stories that evoke our emotional involvement – making movies a multi-dimensional experience. Watching a movie together and observing our reactions and thoughts to the story-lines, events and characters provide lots of information about each other in just about two hours. And, there’s a wealth of information to be gleaned beyond just the plot or the content of the films.

Movies can spotlight many life-circumstance issues that are important to us but often coast just-under-the-radar early in the development of a new relationship. You can select movie content likely to query issues that are important to you (i.e., fidelity, children, careers, alternative relationship structures, etc.). You can choose movie genres that demonstrate levels of risk-taking, humor-styles or intellectual effort. You can choose movies that reflect values that are important to you, allowing you to observe your potential partner’s response to those values. At the very least, you can enjoy a non-committal evening with a movie that you know you’ll enjoy.

The next time you watch a movie together, you might consider making it more than just fun – See if the following hints/questions about choices and movie behavior can add a third dimension to your movie experience.

Decision/Action style – When you plan a movie date, who picks which movie to see? When you don’t agree on just one movie title, who makes the final decision? How do you negotiate or compromise? And what happens if one person caves to appease the other? This “conflict” can provide an opportunity to observe a preview about how you and your partner might potentially resolve conflict in the future.

Personality/Values – In deciding what to see, you’ll each have an opportunity to examine the types of movies the other person enjoys. For example, some people are only interested in romantic comedies, others only in shoot-’em-up action films. As you and your partner identify which movies you are considering, you can also be noting what your film choice might be saying about each of you. Do you prefer intellectual films, slapstick, mysteries, documentaries, art-films, etc.? What is it about the type of movie you like that provides evidence of personality-style or values?

Personal Growth – Can you or your date get value/enjoyment out of a film even if it isn’t your favorite genre? Can you imagine that the character’s experience or challenges can be useful in your own life? The ability to appreciate a story, conflict or circumstance that is seemingly unrelated to one’s experience or understanding could demonstrate a commitment to a broader vision, more expansive thinking and willingness to seize an opportunity for a new experience.

Behavioral clues – Is your partner able to concentrate on the movie? Does he/she make frequent attention-grabbing interruptions. Although you may not be able to define the specific behavior, you might find yourself annoyed during in this little two-hour experience. Are you ready for a life-time of it?

Obviously, choosing and watching a movie together should not be the only “screening” or “testing” technique you use to determine value of your relationship or the worthiness of continuing to explore its potential. But if you use movies intentionally as an experiment (by consciously observing and discussing your reactions, interactions and behaviors), this micro-event can become a useful potential predictor of future relationship alignment.